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Underground Railroad Historical Sites

See downtown's memorials and markers—plus take a tour

Check out the some of the historical markers paying homage to the difficult travels many African American slaves made in the 1800s on the Underground Railroad—and people who took great risks to help them to freedom when they made it north to Detroit.

Finney Barn Historic Marker

Seymour Finney, a Detroiter who owned the Finney Hotel downtown, sheltered escaped slaves at this site before they went to Canada. Capitol Park, State and Griswold streets, Detroit.

Second Baptist Church of Detroit

Michigan's first black congregation, established in 1863, was a station on the Underground Railroad. The church was originally located on Fort Street. Abolitionist Frederick Douglass spoke here. 441 Monroe St., Detroit.

George de Baptiste Home Site Historic Marker

Former site of abolitionist and business owner de Baptiste's home. De Baptiste bought a steamship to secretly take slaves to Canada. East Larned and Beaubien streets, Detroit.

Gateway to Freedom International Memorial

Visit this memorial statue to learn more about Detroit's role in the Underground Railroad as a "gateway to freedom." Hart Plaza, Detroit Riverfront.

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