The Fashion Massacre Showcase and Art Installation is Back for Its 10th Year

Creative director Tyna "FANCE" Logan is introducing Detroit audiences to a new way to think about fashion with "10,000 Hours Project."

The Fashion Massacre is back for the 10th year, offering audiences an experience that combines art and fashion in a contemporary way.

The Fashion Massacre showcases credible artists and designers from the Detroit area and beyond. On May 9 and 10, 2019, guests will be taken on a fashion ride they won’t forget with back-to-back shows at Jam Handy and Goddess Boutique in Detroit, respectively.

Named “The 10,000 Hours Project,” the showcase will bring back the best artists and designers from years passed to showcase their growth, imagination and innovation.

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The Massacre was founded in 2009 by Detroit native and creative director Tyna “FANCE” Logan. She says she wanted to bring the New York Fashion Week vibe to Detroit and that she was determined to change the narrative of Detroit fashion shows.

“I feel like what makes The Fashion Massacre stand out is the extra creativity put in(to) the project.”  Logan and her dedicated team spend countless hours pawning over every little detail. From the venue choice to the models’ makeup to the live music, she says, “We see art from every aspect of the show.”

The title of the show was inspired by Canadian journalist, author and public speaker Malcolm Gladwell. He said if you work on your skill and passion consistently for 10,000 hours you will have crossed over to mastering the skill.

Logan says, “I feel like I’m at the point of mastering this. I can feel the energy of the event.” After 10 years of hard work, the team sees The Fashion Massacre in a different scope. She says this year the show will stand out showcasing more “clarity, organization, creativity and high fashion.”

The Fashion Massacure is known for nontraditional venues and for creating a unique fashion experience. Logan says the venue has to fit the vision of the show – not the other way around. Both venues this year give audiences a grungy, rugged look, exaggerated by exposed brick.

Day one will consist of cut-and-sew designers. Audiences can expect high fashion, evening wear and street wear. For the 10th anniversary celebration, The Massacre is bringing back runway fashion on day one. On day two, the designers will be displayed on a showroom stage so guests can connect with the designers on a personal level.

Each designer will have creative control over how their art and fashion is showcased. For example, one creator will design a look, fit the model and sew the garment, all while audiences watch.

The Fashion Massacre puts in work off the runway, too. Their Vision Detroit program works with youth who have an interest in all areas of fashion and photography. The team goes to middle and high schools introducing students to the possibilities of art and fashion. Free workshops are coming soon.

“There’s an industry who needs us,” Logan says. “That’s our way of giving back, showing the community (that) there’s an avenue of fashion here.”

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